Category: FCC Zipline Series

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FCC Zipline Series 104: Build a JavaScript Calculator | The JS Way

Today, we are going to be building a calculator app using vanilla JavaScript . No jQuery or other third party libraries/frameworks involved. I’m even going to make it more complicated by using objects and prototypical inheritance, so do not expect a quick and dirty job. Here’s a demo of what we’ll be building.

We’ll build a Calculator “class”, which will take care of the application logic. This Calculator, will have methods that we can access to pass it numbers, operations and all sorts of cool stuff that’s it.

FCC Zipline Series 103: Build a Pomodoro Clock

This time, we are going to build our own Pomodoro Clock. No, this is not a Pomodoro, it’s actually a Commodore:

Commodore Norrington

The Pomodoro clock has it’s own history, which is somewhat irrelevant to us at this point, but bear with me while I take you in a journey through time and space, a time of… Nevermind, it’s really just a clock. Actually, not even a clock, but a timer that allows us to set a few parameters. Namely: Pomodoro cycle time (25 min default) and break time (5 min default).

As a note, I will mention that we are not going to be using jQuery or any other library in this process. At the end of this post, you can find links to a live version of this exercise, along with an AngularJS and React version.

FCC Zipline Series 102: Build a Random Quote Machine | The React Way

This time, we are going to be building a Random Quote Machine. We must code a page that replicates the functionalities present here. The user stories that we must fulfil are the following:

  • As a user, I can click a button to show me a new random quote.
  • Bonus: As a user, I can press a button to tweet out a quote.

I’m going to take this chance to let you take a peek into React. If you just want the walk-through for the vanilla JavaScript version, take a look at this other post.

You may, or may not have heard about React before, but it’s getting quite popular as of late. It’s a library made by the guys at Facebook, who describe it as the following:

React: A JavaScript library for building user interfaces.

It’s a front-end framework similar to Angular, Ember or Backbone (someone reading this is probably orchestrating my assassination right now, bear with me please) but not quite so. In a MVC (Model View Controller) architecture, we could say that react is our V (View).

Hopefully, this exercise will grant you some insight into what React is and how it operates at a basic level; and help you decide whether to give it a shot or not. I’m also putting up an AngularJS and vanilla JavaScript version of this same exercise, in case you’re more interested in those.

FCC Zipline Series 102: Build a Random Quote Machine | The JS Way

This time, we are going to be building a Random Quote Machine. We must code a page that replicates the functionalities present here. The user stories that we must fulfil are the following:

  • As a user, I can click a button to show me a new random quote.
  • Bonus: As a user, I can press a button to tweet out a quote.

I’m going to take you through the process of setting up the JS code necessary for this app to work. If you want to give React a chance, go ahead and visit this other post, where we’ll build this same app using Facebook’s React framework.

FCC Zipline Series 101: Build a Personal Portfolio Webpage

What better way to get started with the front-end than creating your own portfolio? This first Zipline will have you build up your portfolio website from scratch. I’m going to go dead basic on this, no external tools or bundling bonanza. Just HTML, CSS, JS and a few few libraries.

Building stuff, anything really, as vague as it may seem, is the best way to keep your skills sharp. For this particular project, we’re asked to fulfill the following user stories:

  • As a user, I can access all of the portfolio webpage’s content just by scrolling.
  • As a user, I can click different buttons that will take me to the portfolio creator’s different social media pages.
  • As a user, I can see thumbnail images of different projects the portfolio creator has built (if you haven’t built any websites before, use placeholders.)
  • Bonus: As a user, I navigate to different sections of the webpage by clicking buttons in the navigation.

Now, get scared. I won’t be using Bootstrap or jQuery at all. For heavens sake, it’s a static, single page site. It has two advantages, it’s easy to navigate, and it is fast. Having to include Bootstrap and jQuery will just slow it down and spoil you (feel free to use them though 🙂 ).